A German university is offering three $1,900 scholarships for students to ‘do nothing’

Applicants from all over the world are welcome to apply.

Agencies
The idleness grant is inspired by the idea that refraining from doing something may actually benefit others, who would otherwise be impacted by the negative consequences of our actions. (Image: © HfBK / Tim Albrecht)
If you’ve ever wanted someone to cover all your educational fees, this may be the scholarship for you. A German university is offering $1,900 (or Rs. 1.39 lakhs) scholarships to three students for “doing nothing” and applicants from all over the world are welcome to apply.

Last week, the University of Fine Arts in Hamburg opened applications for their "Scholarships for Doing Nothing," program and submissions are open until September 15th. The scholarship was created by a professor in hopes of encouraging students to strive for “a lack of consequences” rather than success.

Inspired by the idea that refraining from doing something may actually benefit others, who would otherwise be impacted by the negative consequences of our actions, the submission questionnaire asks applicants to think about an activity they do not want to do, how long they don't want to do it for, why it is important to not do the specific thing in question, and why they are the right person not to do it.


"The world we are living in is driven by the belief in success, in growth, in money. This thinking was leading us into the ecological crisis -- and social injustice -- we are living in. We wanted to turn that upside down -- giving a grant not for the 'best' and for 'doing a project,' but for doing nothing,” said the creator of the scholarship project - Friedrich von Borries, a professor of design theory at the university - in an interview with a popular news channel.

The three winners of the scholarship will have their ideas featured in an exhibition at Hamburg’s Museum of Art and Design from November 5th until May 9th, 2021.

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