Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won Nobel Prize in chemistry, passes away at 90

Shimomura shared the 2008 Nobel prize with two scientists for discovering a jellyfish protein.

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Osamu Shimomura
TOKYO: Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes.

Shimomura and two American scientists shared the 2008 Nobel prize for the discovery and development of a jellyfish protein that later contributed to cancer studies.

Shimomura was born in northern Kyoto in 1928 and studied in Nagasaki, where he survived the Aug. 9, 1945, U.S. atomic bombing at age 16. His high school education was cut short during World War II as he was mobilized to work at a munitions factory.


Osamu Shimomura
Osamu Shimomura

He eventually earned chemistry degree in 1951 from Nagasaki College of Pharmacy.

In 1960 he moved to Princeton University, where he isolated the protein in samples of thousands of jellyfish taken from the U.S. West Coast, often with the help of his wife Akemi.

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The protein known as Green Fluorescent Protein lets off a glow when it is illuminated with ultraviolet light and has become a key tool in studying biological processes in cells.

Nadia Murad, Arthur Ashkin, Gregory Winter: Meet This Year's Nobel Laureates
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Swedish chemist, engineer and philanthropist Alfred Bernhard Nobel believed people can improve the society with knowledge, science and humanism.

Nobel Prize, part of the scientist's will, has been in existence since 1895. The award is presented for exceptional work in the fields of physics, chemistry, physiology/medicine, literature, peace and economic sciences.

After a #MeToo scandal, this year's Literature Prize was scrapped for the first time in 70 years.

Here's a look at the Nobel laureates of 2018.

Swedish chemist, engineer and philanthropist Alfred Bernhard Nobel believed people can improve the society with knowledge, science and humanism. Nobel Prize, part of the scientist's will, has be..
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The Norwegian Nobel Committee has awarded this year's Peace Prize to a gynaecologist Denis Mukwege (L) and the Yazidi human rights activist Nadia Murad. The duo were presented with the award for their efforts to end use of sexual abuse as a war and armed conflict weapon.

Mukwege was lauded for devoting his life to treat victims of sexual violence in Congo.

The Nobel committee said in a statement that Murad is one of an estimated 3,000 Yazidi girls and women who were victims of rape and other abuses by the Islamic State army in Iraq.

(Image: The Nobel Prize/Twitter)

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has awarded this year's Peace Prize to a gynaecologist Denis Mukwege (L) and the Yazidi human rights activist Nadia Murad. The duo were presented with the award for th..
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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Gregory Winter (L), Frances Arnold (C) and George Smith.

Arnold received the prize for 'directing evolution of enzymes'. Her work supported the environment-friendly manufacture of chemicals. This also included drugs used in production of renewable fuels.

Winter and Smith shared the other half of the prize for their work with drugs. While Smith developed a new way for evolving proteins, Winter figured out the path for evolving antibodies. The production of these new drugs were deemed effective for curing metastatic cancer and counteracting autoimmune diseases.

The first drug based on their work was used for rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis.

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Gregory Winter (L), Frances Arnold (C) and George Smith. Arnold received the prize for 'directing evolution of enzymes'. Her work supported the enviro..
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The Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to three scientists - Arthur Ashkin (L), Donna Strickland (C) and Gérard Mourou - for creating the ‘tools made of light’.

Ashkin, 96, is oldest scientist ever to receive the Nobel Prize. He was awarded for creating ‘optical tweezers’. It is more of a technology than a physical instrument. These tweezers are used for isolating tiny particles such as individual atoms, biological cells and DNA strands.

Mourou and Strickland shared the other half of the prize for developing an intense laser pulse which can be used in scientific and medical applications such as eye surgeries.

The Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to three scientists - Arthur Ashkin (L), Donna Strickland (C) and Gérard Mourou - for creating the ‘tools made of light’. Ashkin, 96, is oldest scientist ..
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James P Allison (L) and Tusuku Honjo bagged the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine. The two immunologists were awarded for their therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. They showed how our immune system can be engaged in fighting tumour cells.

Allison and Honjo's research revealed how different strategies for inhibiting brakes on the immune system can help with cancer treatment.

James P Allison (L) and Tusuku Honjo bagged the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine. The two immunologists were awarded for their therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. They showed how our im..
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Shimomura was based in the U.S., but had moved back to Nagasaki to be close to his relatives, Nagasaki University officials said.

The devastation from the atomic bomb that killed 70,000 in Nagasaki, left a lasting impression on Shimomura and he often mentioned his experience and called for nuclear weapons ban in his lectures later in life.

From Buying A Holiday Home To Getting A Motorbike, Here's How Nobel Winners Spent $1mn Prize Money
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Wheels of fortune

The 2001 winner of Physiology or Medicine invested a large chunk of his award money in acquiring a powerful motorbike. He also owns a Kawasaki 500, and reportedly flies a plane when visiting the family home in Oxfordshire.
Wheels of fortune The 2001 winner of Physiology or Medicine invested a large chunk of his award money in acquiring a powerful motorbike. He also owns a Kawasaki 500, and reportedly flies a plane whe..
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Having a ball

The 1993 Physiology or Medicine category co-winner used his winnings to create a 8,000 sq ft croquet lawn in front of his house. "I had always wanted one, and this seemed like it might be my only opportunity to afford it," he told a news magazine.
Having a ball The 1993 Physiology or Medicine category co-winner used his winnings to create a 8,000 sq ft croquet lawn in front of his house. "I had always wanted one, and this seemed like it might..
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Fitting home

For Phillip Sharp, the co-winner in Physiology or Medicine category in 1993, the prize money was enough to add to the money he received from the sale of his home, to buy a century-old Federal style house. "I took that money and bought a bigger house... It's a beautiful old place," he told a news agency.

(Image: www.nobelprize.org)
Fitting home For Phillip Sharp, the co-winner in Physiology or Medicine category in 1993, the prize money was enough to add to the money he received from the sale of his home, to buy a century-old F..
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Freedom

For the Belarusian 2015 literature category winner, the $9,53,000 prize money meant freedom. "I use the award money to buy freedom. (sic) I write books for a long time, and that takes money — go around and print. Now I can work quietly without thinking how to earn money," she said.

(Image: www.nobelprize.org)
Freedom For the Belarusian 2015 literature category winner, the $9,53,000 prize money meant freedom. "I use the award money to buy freedom. (sic) I write books for a long time, and that takes money ..
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Holiday home

Physicist Leon Lederman, who won the award in 1988, used the prize money to buy a vacation cabin in Idaho, which is where he and his wife live. Interestingly, Lederman's gold medal was auctioned in 2015 to pay for his medical expenses. It fetched $7,65,002.

(Image: www.nobelprize.org)
Holiday home Physicist Leon Lederman, who won the award in 1988, used the prize money to buy a vacation cabin in Idaho, which is where he and his wife live. Interestingly, Lederman's gold medal was ..
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Fine furnish

The 2010 winner in economics revealed that he used up a part of the roughly $3,30,000 prize money on "lavish furnishings" for his new apartment. He spent another chunk on clothes and travel expenses for his family, who accompanied him to Stockholm to receive the award.

(Image: www.nobelprize.org)
Fine furnish The 2010 winner in economics revealed that he used up a part of the roughly $3,30,000 prize money on "lavish furnishings" for his new apartment. He spent another chunk on clothes and tr..
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