Painting of Donald Trump to go under the hammer before elections, can rake in $750,000

The 2017 painting by New York artist Dana Schutz depicts a familiar stocky figure.

Bloomberg
The image riffs on Trump’s famous 2015 escalator ride at Trump Tower in New York when he announced he was running for president.
By Katya Kazakina

Before he became U.S. President, Donald Trump used $10,000 from his foundation to buy a six-foot-tall oil portrait of himself at auction.

Next week, he’ll have a chance to bid on a bigger, albeit less flattering image: “Trump Descending an Escalator.”


The 2017 painting by New York artist Dana Schutz depicts a familiar stocky figure with bulging eyes riding down a golden escalator. The work is a highlight of the 20th century and contemporary art auction at Phillips being held just two weeks before the U.S. election. About 7-feet-tall and 6-feet-wide, it will be offered in London on Oct. 20, with an estimate of 380,000 pounds to 580,000 pounds ($750,000).

“Dana Schutz is one of the most significant painters of her generation and she has never shied away from challenging or hot button subjects,” said Robert Manley, deputy chairman at Phillips. The work touches “on a dizzying array of politics, art history and pop art.”

The image riffs on Trump’s famous 2015 escalator ride at Trump Tower in New York when he announced he was running for president. The moment became fodder for late-night comedians and made a cameo appearance on “The Simpsons.” It’s also a nod to “Nude Descending a Staircase,” a 1912 canvas by Marcel Duchamp.
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Schutz, 44, is known for large and bold figurative canvases that re-imagine historic and mundane situations, often by adding elements of the absurd. She created the Trump work for a fundraiser at Petzel gallery in New York in January 2017.

“I don’t really make super-topical paintings,” Schutz later said about the Trump painting in a New Yorker interview. “But I wanted to get that moment of suspense, when you know something is going to happen and there’s nothing you can do to stop it.”

While not overtly political, Schutz’s work has sparked controversy. Soon after the Petzel show, another painting, “Open Casket,” depicting Black teenager Emmett Till who was tortured and lynched in 1955, drew protests and calls for removal - and even destruction - at the Whitney Biennial. The artist, who is White, was accused by activists of exploiting Black history. The painting remained on view, but Schutz had said she won’t sell it.

“Trump Descending an Escalator” was priced at $200,000 when it sold in 2017 to an anonymous collector, according to Petzel. The artist’s auction record is $2.4 million.
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Lifting The Lid On A Priceless Collection: 400 Pieces Of Ancient Indian Treasures To Be Auctioned In NY
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A dagger of an emperor, an ornate pen case and a 17th century necklace of the Nizam. These are among the 400 pieces of ancient Indian treasures and Mughal jewels set to go under the hammer in New York on June 19.

It is a known fact that during the reign of the Mughal dynasty, jewelled pen case and inkwell sets were presented to persons of utmost distinction. This emerald, ruby and diamond-set pen case and inkwell has the engraving of a sacred swan or hamsa under the inkwell. It is dated back to the late 16th century and is said to have originated in the Deccan region.

A dagger of an emperor, an ornate pen case and a 17th century necklace of the Nizam. These are among the 400 pieces of ancient Indian treasures and Mughal jewels set to go under the hammer in New Yor..
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The Belle Époque diamond jigha was made in 1907 and remodelled around 1935. The ornament is set with old baguette and pear-shaped diamonds. It is made of white gold. On the reverse is a plume holder. The lower part of the ornament is detachable and can be worn as a brooch, according to the Christie’s website. The total weight of the diamonds in this turban ornament is approximately 152.60 carats.

The Belle Époque diamond jigha was made in 1907 and remodelled around 1935. The ornament is set with old baguette and pear-shaped diamonds. It is made of white gold. On the reverse is a plume holder...
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The Mirror of Paradise is a D-colour internally flawless diamond of 52.58 carats. The diamond was found in the Golconda region in South India.

Until the 1730s, India was known to be the world’s supplier of diamonds. Many of the world’s famous diamonds — the Koh-i-Noor, the Regent and the Hope diamonds — were found in the riverbeds of the Deccan region.

The Mirror of Paradise is a D-colour internally flawless diamond of 52.58 carats. The diamond was found in the Golconda region in South India.Until the 1730s, India was known to be the world’s suppli..
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The Nizam of Hyderabad necklace is a magnificent piece from the late 19th century. It is made of gold with seven large foiled triangular diamonds, each framed in an openwork panel of kundan-set diamond leaves, says Christie’s. At front centre is a triangular diamond pendant surrounded by 12 diamond leaves, mounted on an inner edge with a melon-cut emerald bead.

The Nizam of Hyderabad necklace is a magnificent piece from the late 19th century. It is made of gold with seven large foiled triangular diamonds, each framed in an openwork panel of kundan-set diamo..
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This piece of jewellery is a magnificent example of the fusion between the East and the West. The necklace was commissioned by Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala. It was created by Cartier in 1931. This ruby, pearl and diamond necklace is just one example of Maharaja Bhupinder Singh’s long relationship with the house of Cartier. It has 292 ruby beads weighing 356.56 carats, interspersed with panels of 132 threaded pearls, caught at each side with clasps of 120 diamonds and rubies set in platinum, each clasp formed of a cluster of six cabochon claw-set rubies. The necklace was restored and restrung by Cartier Tradition in 2012.

This piece of jewellery is a magnificent example of the fusion between the East and the West. The necklace was commissioned by Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala. It was created by Cartier in 1931. ..
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The ornate jade-hilted dagger was commissioned by Jahangir, the fourth Mughal Emperor of India, in the early 17th century. The carved youth’s head on the hilt is speculated to be based on an ivory representation of Jesus.

Upon Jahangir’s death in 1627, the blade passed on to his son and successor, Shah Jahan, who reworked the blade and added two Mughal inscriptions to it — a royal umbrella and a fish. In the 1850s the dagger was also owned by Samuel FB Morse, the creator of the eponymous code and inventor of the telegraph, who was also an art collector.


(All images: christies.com)

The ornate jade-hilted dagger was commissioned by Jahangir, the fourth Mughal Emperor of India, in the early 17th century. The carved youth’s head on the hilt is speculated to be based on an ivory re..
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