Sally Rooney's new novel ‘Beautiful World, Where Are You’ to hit the shelves in September

The new novel is likely to be one of this year’s most anticipated books.

Rooney became a literary sensation with the release of her 2017 debut novel, 'Conversations With Friends', which she wrote while studying for a master’s degree in American literature at Trinity College in Dublin.
A little more than two years ago, novelist Sally Rooney seemed poised to take a well-earned victory lap. At 27, she had published two bestselling and acclaimed novels, 'Conversations With Friends' and 'Normal People', which was nominated for the Man Booker Prize. Critics anointed her as “a writer of rare confidence” and “the first great millennial novelist.”

Rooney wasn’t so sure about the hype — or her long-term prospects as a novelist. “I have no idea if I’ll write another book,” she told the Irish Independent in 2018. “Maybe I am one of those people who writes two novels in their 20s, then never writes anything else again.”

Thankfully for her many devoted readers, Rooney gave it another try. In September, Farrar, Straus and Giroux will release her new novel, 'Beautiful World, Where Are You', which follows four young characters in Ireland as they navigate the pressures of work and relationships against the backdrop of political turmoil and fears about their economic futures.


“The title itself speaks to some of the book’s themes, it’s an unanswered question,” Mitzi Angel, the publisher of FSG, said. “The characters are contemplating a world in which the future is very uncertain for them — what’s the world of work going to look like, what’s going to happen to the planet, what are the politics we are all living through. I think the stakes are higher.”

The new novel is likely to be one of this year’s most anticipated books. Rooney’s first two novels have sold more than 1 million copies in the United States alone.


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Angel acquired U.S. rights to the new novel from the Wylie Agency as part of a two-book deal. FSG declined to provide details about the second book.

Rooney was previously published in the United States by Hogarth, a Penguin Random House imprint. In moving to FSG, a division of Macmillan, Rooney is reuniting with Angel, who, as the publisher of Faber & Faber from 2015-18, published Rooney’s first two novels in Britain. Angel acquired Rooney’s books for Faber & Faber after prevailing in a seven-way auction.

“Sally and I have a history, and of course I’d secretly hoped that I might one day be able to publish her again,” Angel said.

Rooney became a literary sensation with the release of her 2017 debut novel, 'Conversations With Friends', which she wrote while studying for a master’s degree in American literature at Trinity College in Dublin.

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Narrated by a Trinity student named Frances who is grappling with the realities of adulthood, the novel drew accolades from prominent writers like Zadie Smith, Curtis Sittenfeld and Celeste Ng.

Rooney followed with 'Normal People', a novel about the tortured friendship and romance between Marianne and Connell, who meet as teenagers from different socioeconomic backgrounds and whose social fortunes diverge further when they too end up at Trinity. The novel cemented Rooney’s reputation as a literary talent and was adapted into a television series. “She’s an original writer who, you sense, is just getting started,” Dwight Garner wrote in The New York Times.

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'Beautiful World, Where Are You' also examines romantic relationships between young adults — but the characters are older, and the problems that occupy them are more global and entrenched. Set largely in Dublin and a nearby town, it centers on four characters — a novelist named Alice, her best friend Eileen, and their respective love interests, Felix and Simon. In conversations and email exchanges, the friends dissect their love lives and their fears about the future of the planet.

“Her books are always political, because they’re about how people need to figure out how to live together, how should we behave,” Angel said. “Those questions are present in the book, and she asks them without earnestness, but with a great deal of sincerity.”

Predictive Text: 'Frankenstein', '1984' And Other Books That Foretold The Future
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A look back at the different times when authors unleashed the Nostradamus in them and came up with something that was years ahead of its time.

A look back at the different times when authors unleashed the Nostradamus in them and came up with something that was years ahead of its time.

Vision: Virus outbreak

In 1981, Dean Koontz wrote a novel titled 'The Eyes of Darkness'. In the book, Koontz mentions a fictional biological weapon Wuhan-400, nearly 40 years before the coronavirus outbreak occurred.

'The Eyes of Darkness' is a story about a mother who discovers her son Danny is being kept in a military facility after being infected with a man-made microorganism called ‘Wuhan-400’. While Twitter went into a little bit of tizzy, that’s where the similarity ends. Unlike the book’s virus, which has a 100 per cent fatality rate, the real world covid-40 has a fatality rate that ranges between two per cent and 14 per cent, depending on several factors.

(Image: Amazon)

Vision: Virus outbreakIn 1981, Dean Koontz wrote a novel titled 'The Eyes of Darkness'. In the book, Koontz mentions a fictional biological weapon Wuhan-400, nearly 40 years before the coronavirus ou..
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Vision: Electric submarines

Jules Verne is considered one of the most forward thinking authors of the 19th century and has predicted numerous things in his most famous book, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea, which was published in 1870. Verne not only predicted electric submarines 90 years before they were invented, he also imagined them just as they turned out — long and cylindrical. Verne’s submarine called Nautilus also included a main cabin, navigational devices, a dining room, and barometer.

(Image: barnesandnoble.com)

Vision: Electric submarinesJules Verne is considered one of the most forward thinking authors of the 19th century and has predicted numerous things in his most famous book, Twenty Thousand Leagues Un..
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Vision: Mass surveillance

Orwell’s book focuses on topics we are all too familiar with today: Censorship, propaganda, surveillance, and oppressive governments. It was written nearly 70 years ago. In the book, Orwell predicted mass surveillance and police helicopters. Much of what the British author imagined has come true, including facial recognition, speech to text conversion, music made by artificial intelligence, and, of course, the concept of ‘Big Brother’ watching your every move.

(Image: Amazon)

Vision: Mass surveillanceOrwell’s book focuses on topics we are all too familiar with today: Censorship, propaganda, surveillance, and oppressive governments. It was written nearly 70 years ago. In t..
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Vision: Mars has two moons

This all-time favourite book follows a man named Gulliver as he stops at different worlds, those occupied by giants, another by little humans, and one of the most interesting, the island of Laputa. Laputa, in the book, is a floating world filled with scientists. Swift writes about how Gulliver and Laputian astronomers noted that Mars has two moons in its orbit. Today we know this claim to be true, that Mars indeed does have two moons. But Swift wrote 'Gulliver’s Travels' in 1726, nearly 150 years before Phobos and Deimos — the two moons of Mars — were discovered in 1877.

Vision: Mars has two moonsThis all-time favourite book follows a man named Gulliver as he stops at different worlds, those occupied by giants, another by little humans, and one of the most interestin..
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Vision: Organ Transplants

Written in 1818, Shelley’s novel is often considered one of the first science-fiction novels. At that time, science was just beginning to explore the concept of bringing dead tissue back to life using electricity. In Mary Shelley’s 'Frankenstein', the doctor is able to keep an organ alive outside of a body to be transplanted into a new body. To say this was ahead of its time is an understatement. It wasn’t until the mid-20th century (1954) that the first organ transplant became a reality.

Vision: Organ TransplantsWritten in 1818, Shelley’s novel is often considered one of the first science-fiction novels. At that time, science was just beginning to explore the concept of bringing dead..
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