WHO wants travellers to be alert and wear masks on planes, will also update Covid-19 guidelines

Travellers must also keep themselves informed about COVID-19 cases in different countries.

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WHO Spokeswoman Margaret Harris urged people not to be caught off-guard by resurgent local epidemics and quarantine measures.
GENEVA: The World Health Organization on Tuesday urged travellers to wear masks on planes and keep themselves informed as COVID-19 cases surge again in some countries, prompting new restrictions in places like Australia.

Spokeswoman Margaret Harris urged people not to be caught off-guard by resurgent local epidemics and quarantine measures, saying: "If it's anywhere, it's everywhere and people travelling have to understand that."

"This virus is widespread and people have to take that very, very seriously."


The WHO said last month that it would update its travel guidelines ahead of the northern hemisphere summer holidays but they have not yet been released.

In the meantime, travellers should "remember things will change, or may well change", Harris said at a Geneva briefing.

"We're seeing a lot of upticks, a lot of changes in different countries, countries that had successfully shut down their first transmission are seeing second upticks," she added, mentioning Australia and Hong Kong.
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Lockdown measures were reimposed in Australia's second biggest city on Tuesday, confining Melbourne residents to their homes unless undertaking essential business, as officials scramble to contain a coronavirus outbreak.

The WHO's previous guidance for travellers has included common-sense advice applicable to other settings such as social distancing, washing your hands and avoiding touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Harris also proposed on Tuesday wearing a mask on planes, a measure which is already a requirement of many airlines.

"If you are flying, there is no way you can social distance in a plane, so you will need to take other precautions including using a face covering," she said.
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Bust The Myth Bubble: Sesame Oil, Alcohol Sprays Can't Prevent Coronavirus
1/11
A lot of what you hear or read about the coronavirus may be myths. WHO data busts a few common misconceptions.
A lot of what you hear or read about the coronavirus may be myths. WHO data busts a few common misconceptions.
Myth: Pneumonia vaccines will protect you against coronavirus.

Reality: Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protection against coronavirus. The virus is so new and different that it needs its own vaccine. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV, and WHO is supporting their efforts. However, while they are not effective against 2019-nCoV, vaccination against respiratory illnesses is highly recommended to protect your health.
Myth: Pneumonia vaccines will protect you against coronavirus. Reality: Vaccines against pneumonia, such as pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccine, do not provide protec..
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Myth: Ultraviolet disinfection lamp can kill the coronavirus.

Reality: UV lamps should not be used to sterilise hands or other areas of skin. Far from killing the virus, the UV radiation can actually cause skin irritation.
Myth: Ultraviolet disinfection lamp can kill the coronavirus. Reality: UV lamps should not be used to sterilise hands or other areas of skin. Far from killing the virus, the UV radiation can actuall..
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Myth: Thermal scanners can help detect infected people.

Reality: Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever due to the coronavirus infection. However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with the fever. This is because it takes between two and 10 days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever.
Myth: Thermal scanners can help detect infected people. Reality: Thermal scanners are effective in detecting people who have developed a fever due to the coronavirus infection. However, they cannot ..
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Myth: Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over the body kill the coronavirus.

Reality: Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. In fact, spraying such substances can be harmful to clothes or mucous membranes (ie eyes, mouth). Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be used to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.
Myth: Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over the body kill the coronavirus. Reality: Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. In fact..
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Myth: Putting on sesame oil will block the coronavirus from entering the body.

Reality: Sesame oil does not kill coronavirus. There are some chemical disinfectants that can kill the 2019-nCoV on surfaces. These include bleach or chlorine-based disinfectants, solvents, 75 per cent ethanol, peracetic acid and chloroform. However, they have little or no impact on the virus if you put them on the skin or under your nose. It can even be dangerous to put these chemicals on your skin.
Myth: Putting on sesame oil will block the coronavirus from entering the body. Reality: Sesame oil does not kill coronavirus. There are some chemical disinfectants that can kill the 2019-nCoV on sur..
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Myth: Coronavirus mainly affects older people.

Reality: People of all ages can be infected by the 2019-nCoV. Older people, and people with preexisting medical conditions [such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease] appear to be more vulnerable. But WHO has advised people of all ages to take steps to protect themselves from the virus.
Myth: Coronavirus mainly affects older people. Reality: People of all ages can be infected by the 2019-nCoV. Older people, and people with preexisting medical conditions [such as asthma, diabetes, h..
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Myth: Rinsing your nose with saline will help prevent coronavirus infection.

Reality: There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from a coronavirus infection. But there is some limited evidence that regularly rinsing nose with saline can help people recover more quickly from a common cold. However, regularly rinsing the nose has not been shown to prevent respiratory infections.
Myth: Rinsing your nose with saline will help prevent coronavirus infection. Reality: There is no evidence that regularly rinsing the nose with saline has protected people from a coronavirus infecti..
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Myth: It’s not safe to receive letters or packages from China.

Reality: It is safe to receive letters and packages from China. People receiving packages from China are not at risk of contracting the coronavirus. From previous analysis, we know that coronaviruses do not survive long on objects such as letters or packages.
Myth: It’s not safe to receive letters or packages from China. Reality: It is safe to receive letters and packages from China. People receiving packages from China are not at risk of contracting the..
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Myth: Pets at home can spread the coronavirus

Reality: At present, there is no evidence that companion animals or pets such as dogs or cats can be infected with the coronavirus. However, it is always a good idea to wash your hands with soap and water after contact with these pets. This will protect you against various common bacteria such as E.coli and Salmonella that can pass between pets and humans.
Myth: Pets at home can spread the coronavirus Reality: At present, there is no evidence that companion animals or pets such as dogs or cats can be infected with the coronavirus. However, it is alway..
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